EVERY DAY IS LAUNDRY DAY

It’s been nearly a week, and the bathroom still smells strongly of radishes. It must be the cleaning solution… or… or something?

At any rate, my jeans are drying on the line in the warmest, breeziest spot. I’m very pleased, as I expected them to take about three days to dry, and it looks like I just have to wait until tomorrow morning for them to be ready. Washing them was a beast.

But I should explain. Here in London, everything is expensive and all the students are about 40% poorer than they are in the states–needless to say, tight budgets all around. My budget seems to be tighter than most (about ¬£1,500), so to save a little money, I’m washing all my laundry by hand using the powdered soap I found at the nifty little 99p Store.

Almost every day, I take my dirty laundry into the shower. I tried asking about using the kitchen sink, but the security guard was mortified.

“No,” he said. “You must use the laundry. You can’t use the kitchen sink to wash your clothes! People need to use that!”

A shirt, a t-shirt, and my jeans.

A shirt, a t-shirt, and my jeans.

Him saying nothing about the bathroom and me not wanting to force the matter, I decided to just roll my things up into a little bundle and take them there. After a couple days, I usually only have a few things to wash, and nothing very soiled.

The shower actually seems like it was made for me to do laundry in. I step up a few steps, and the stall itself is actually set into the floor about four inches, plenty of depth for soaking clothes.

I wear my underwear into the shower to wash it, and for the rest I wrap this nifty little kit together (to hide the soap from the cameras in the hallway; no need to push it with security!):

Soap, a regular towel I got for free from my advisor, and my shammy, for drying clothes.

Soap, a regular towel I got for free from my advisor, and my shammy, for drying clothes.

I stop the plug using whatever is at hand–socks, clothes I’m not scrubbing, or my favorite, a used Pringles cap. Once everything is done washing, I rinse and then wring everything out in the shammy.

This usually all takes place during the evening, when people are going out and not using the showers. I suppose it must sound strange for someone to walk in and hear clothes being kneaded in a basin of water behind the shower door, but no one has complained yet!

Once everything has been wrung, I hang it all on the clothesline by my window.

Voilà! Clean clothes for free!

I'm glad I only have to wash my jeans once every week or two. I don't think I could take it if they needed more.

I'm glad I only have to wash my jeans once every week or two. I don't think I could take it if they needed more.

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7 responses to “EVERY DAY IS LAUNDRY DAY

  1. Did you actually paint “or cullen does london” on the street!?

  2. thank goodness for genius..i’m glad my plastic container top suggestive was useful to you . Saved you a pence or two also.

  3. John from Blaine County

    This is a horrible idea. jst wash yer clothes like a normal person, man.

    • True, John from Blaine County, using a washing machine would be a little easier (though, now that I’ve experienced both, not by much). But it’s totally not worth the three pounds needed to wash and dry a load here, especially on a budget as tight as mine; when faced with a choice between paying for a machine to wash my clothes (when I could basically just take a long shower instead) and taking a daytrip to Stratford-On-Avon, I’m inclined to choose the latter.

  4. we think it is rather genius

  5. saw the eco–washer..great idea

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